HP to trim 27,000 jobs as part of restructuring programme

HP to trim 27,000 jobs as part of restructuring programme

The cuts will amount to 8 percent of HP's workforce as part of restructuring programme that started last year and is to continue through 2014.

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HP will cut 27,000 jobs as part of its long-term restructuring plan, the company said Wednesday when it announced quarterly financial results.

It confirms media reports last week, which HP had referred to as 'speculation' at the time.

The company will shed about eight percent of its workforce through a combination of layoffs and retirement offers that started 31 October last year, and will continue through the end of its 2014 fiscal year, HP said. Employee reduction plans vary by country.

The restructuring programme is expected to save US$3 billion (£1.9 billion) to $3.5 billion through fiscal year 2014, and a majority of those savings will be reinvested in the company, HP said in a statement.

The job cuts are "difficult" but they also are "necessary to improve execution and to fund long-term health" of HP, CEO Meg Whitman said in a statement.

HP also announced that its net income for the second quarter, which ended 30 April, was $1.6 billion, a drop of 31 percent over the same quarter a year ago. It reported revenue of $30.7 billion, down three percent.

Excluding one-time charges, the company's earnings per share was $0.98, which topped the consensus estimate of $0.91 from analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.

The company also forecast third quarter earnings of $0.94 to $0.97, below previous expectations of $1.02 per share, but it expects that its full-year earnings will be $4.05 to $4.10, rather than $4.03 that analysts had forecast.

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