City University calls for creative future leaders

IT managers can learn how to use creativity to achieve business innovation

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City University London is launching a new Masters degree for professionals who have some management experience, but want to climb further up the ladder by encouraging innovation.

The Masters in Innovation, Creativity and Leadership (MICL) is aimed at professionals in any industry who want to develop their leadership skills, learn how to tap into the creative potential of individuals and organisation, build a working environment that encourages innovation and how to transform ideas into business revenue.

The part-time, two-year course will start in September 2010. The course will award either a MSc or a Master of Innovation (MInnov) qualification.

City University said that the degree was launched in response to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills’ (BIS’) recent Going for Growth Strategy, which called for greater innovation to aid economic recovery.

The course will be led by former Saatchi director, Roger Neill, who runs the university’s Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice. Academics from City University’s Cass Business School, School of Informatics, School of Social Sciences, School of Arts and The City Law School, will also provide their expertise.

Neill said: "Often, creativity is viewed as the preserve of the 'creative industries' rather than something that should be standard practice throughout the business world.

"The MICL intends to dispel that myth, by training leaders who are intrinsically innovative, and can turn their new ideas into practice, no matter what sector they work in."

The university said that graduates of the course could go on to gain senior management roles in either the private or the public sector, in areas such as systems engineering, business analysis, interaction design and computing games, in the IT sector.

Applications to the course can be made here.

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