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City University launches CIO Masters

Part-time course paves way for top-level roles

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City University London is calling for applicants for its Masters course aimed at ambitious IT professionals.

Future chief information officers (CIOs) will be able to sign up for the Masters in Information Leadership (MIL) course starting in September at the university’s Centre for Information Leadership. The centre was set up last year.

The course aims to equip senior IT professionals with the technological, commercial and managerial expertise they need to become CIOs, CTOs or other top-level positions.

The MIL will comprise eight modules ranging from those examining the role of the information leader in organisations and society, to those covering information security, law and finance.

Students will also be able to benefit from a 30-credit Professional and Leadership Development module that will help develop their skills in negotiation.

The part-time course will be taught during one weekend each month over two years by academics from the university’s Cass Business School, its City Law School and practicing CIOs.

Dr Andrew Tuson, MIL course director and creator of the centre, said: "We are bridging the gap that exists between traditional MBA and IT Masters offerings and acknowledging the interdisciplinary nature of the information leader’s role."

As well as the MIL, the CIL provides short courses, doctorates research and consultancy. The centre is based in the university’s school of Informatics.

In August 2009, the university appointed David Chan, the BBC’s former head of business systems, as director of the CIL.

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