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And at the sharper end of things Work and Pensions minister Caroline Flint admitted that no work had yet been done on a key benefits system due in a year.

Over in the private sector, meanwhile, IT rationalisation projects have loomed large, with Cadbury, Royal Bank of Scotland and ArcelorMittal all facing up to different IT challenges in the months ahead.

Lastly, a gentle reminder: this week is your final chance to enter our Green IT survey. Take part and you could even win a green IT audit.

For more detail on these stories, and all this week's news for IT directors and managers, check out ComputerworldUK.com. Share your views with us. Why not download the latest white papers from our comprehensive library of over 3,000 papers and explore the latest opinions on the Computerworld UK site?

Editor's highlights

Four must-read articles on Computerworld UK this week:

DWP 'has not started work' on key benefits systems

Delay leaves only 12 months to deliver £300m IT project

Cadbury says 15% of IT staff will go by Christmas

Outsourcing projects reshape internal IT at chocolate giant

Heinz puts IT vulnerabilities on the business agenda

Don't get in a soup by leaving it to IT

Pre-budget report: 'new' IT code has familiar look

Transformational Government agenda gets an update

Readers' choice

Canonical chases deal to ship Ubuntu server OS

SAP buys Business Objects for £3.3bn

Darzi will probe NHS IT programme for 'clinical benefits'

RBS consortium facing tough IT choices with ABN Amro takeover

ArcelorMittal signs global network deal with BT

Complete our short survey by 15 October to be included in an important environmental benchmark for the IT community.

You'll receive a report of the findings, be in with a chance to benefit from a free Green IT Audit from GAP and Logicalis, and be entered into a draw to win 1 of 10 places at the Green IT House of Commons launch. Find out more

From our blogs

Green Monk: Oracle's shareholders to consider environmental impact of Open Source software?

I told you so... Will you pay the price for virtualisation?

You said it

Join the discussion and debate on our leading stories...

"The public doesn't need ID cards at all, but the Home Office wants us to have one so it can track and control the transactions we make. When you put "your" ID card in the reader and type in a PIN the Home Office will record exactly where you were and what you were doing and hold the record for the rest of your life. If the Home Office thinks you shouldn't be allowed to carry out that transaction, it can instantly deny permission.

This is why the Home Office wants ID cards, and also why they must be stopped."

From: Chip-and-pin capability 'justifies ID cards investment'

Green zone

London office workers cull forests for pointless printing

IT can reduce a company's carbon footprint

IT managers get help with server efficiency

Digging deeper: Public sector focus

Data sharing drives Passport Service takeover of GRO

Smooth e-passports roll-out prompts questions over ID cards

Jobcentre computer systems 'lack basic functionality'

Office of National Statistics surprises with staff transfer under Flex scheme

Digging deeper: Security latest

Patch Tuesday: IE, Outlook, Word get critical bug fixes

Information Commissioner launches data sharing code

Lax passwords expose quarter of PC users to theft

Microsoft offers Internet Explorer 7 to pirates

White papers

Make sure you know what your colleagues are reading. Get the latest white papers from Computerworld UK this week.

Why antivirus solutions do not protect from spyware

Linux on IBM eServer zSeries and S/390: performance measurement and tuning

The necessity of policy management

RFID: A business revolution providing strategic and competitive advantage

Improving the view with IP videoconferencing

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