We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message

Is Microsoft Windows 7 right for netbooks?

Microsoft not really interested in cheap laptop market

Article comments

Microsoft must perform a tricky balancing act as it tries to keep Windows on netbooks but not get stuck in a market that generates little revenue, say industry analysts.

The software giant has still not disclosed how much it plans to charge PC makers for Windows 7 on netbooks. But an increase over the current £10 price for Windows XP is inevitable, says Richard Shim, PC analyst at research firm IDC.


PC makers will face pressure to keep price points down, Shim says, even as Microsoft charges them more for Windows 7 on netbooks than for XP. Microsoft plans to make the limited Windows 7 Starter version and Windows 7 Home Premium available on netbooks, with Home Premium likely costing more.

To be clear, Microsoft has not announced how much it plans to charge PC makers for any versions of Windows 7. Microsoft executives are saying that the average price that PC makers pay for Windows (across all versions) is £30. It currently charges PC makers £10 per copy of Windows XP on netbooks.

Are More Powerful Netbooks Still Netbooks?

Netbooks are still about price and portability, but that could change if consumers and businesses demand more power from small form-factor machines, Shim says.

"Netbooks could soon evolve from being price-focused to more feature-focused if users demand it," says Shim.

If that feature infusion happens, vendors would certainly raise the price, at which point people will stop calling the devices netbooks, says veteran analyst Roger Kay, president of tech research firm Endpoint Technologies.

"This is what both Microsoft and hardware companies want," says Kay. "They want to sell ultrathin laptops for £400 rather than netbooks for £200. But users like netbooks."

Indeed they do. IDC predicts netbook sales will more than double this year, from 11.6 million units in 2008 to 26.5 million in 2009.

Keeping Windows XP Alive

To stay in the netbook game, Microsoft has agreed to continue licensing Windows XP Home Edition to netbook hardware makers for one year after Windows 7 ships on 22 October.

The catch: Microsoft doesn't actually want Windows 7 Starter to gain steam on netbooks, Kay believes.

Share:

Comments

Send to a friend

Email this article to a friend or colleague:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the recipient know who sent the story, and in case of transmission error. Both your name and the recipient's name and address will not be used for any other purpose.


ComputerworldUK Knowledge Vault

ComputerworldUK
Share
x
Open
* *