Microsoft fights piracy amongst partners

Microsoft fights piracy amongst partners

Study says reducing piracy enriches Microsoft's partners

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Microsoft has used the stick to try to correct such behaviour, suing partners selling counterfeit or non-licenced software. Now it is also trying to use the carrot and appeal to partners' economic self-interest.

Wednesday, the company released an IDC study claiming that partners potentially could gain an additional US$5.50 for every $1 Microsoft makes from eliminating pirated software.


Counter-intuitively, it's not retailers and other software resellers that would gain the most from less piracy, according to IDC. Rather, value-added resellers (VARs) and independent software vendors would accrue increased revenues from shorter sales cycles for add-on software and faster delivery of technical services, as well as lower costs for delivering service to legitimately licensed software. The study was co-sponsored by Microsoft and the International Association of Microsoft Certified Partners (IAMCP).

For instance, most partners will hesitate to do work for a customer that's potentially pirating software because they worry that if the "customer is discovered, the liability could suddenly jump to them," said Michael Beare, director of licence compliance for Microsoft's worldwide antipiracy team, in an interview last week before the Worldwide Partner Conference in Houston, where the study was released.

Citing IDC's findings, Beare also claims that pirated software tends to be poorly maintained or insecure, in part because end users don't want to download updates from Microsoft and expose themselves to the company's antipiracy detection technology. As a result, such software is more difficult for partners to work with, increasing their cost of work, he claimed.

Oh really?

But several experts interviewed by Computerworld questioned Microsoft and IDC's assertions, arguing that they appear to be based on unproven assumptions and suspect methodology.

Paul DeGroot, an analyst at the independent Directions on Microsoft, said that although Microsoft has "every right to discourage piracy ... I think the additional revenue for the channel from legal software is speculative.

"My guess would be that partners make more money from customers who use legal software because those customers are less likely to be cheapskate corner-cutters," continued DeGroot. "Making a cheapskate corner-cutter send Microsoft extra money isn't going to make the ISV or partner much richer, in my view. It'll probably kill the relationship, with a net cost to the partner for the time spent burning bridges with a bad customer."

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