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Java development critical to Oracle Fusion strategy

Java development critical to Oracle Fusion strategy

Oracle emphasises Java, JavaServer Faces as key planks in its middleware plan

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Oracle's launch of Fusion Middleware 11g today has firmly emphasised the role of Java technologies at the company.

This focus is likely to reassure some Java developers, who have been concerned about the impact of Oracle’s purchase of Java founder Sun Microsystems.


The Fusion announcement featured a multifaceted suite of technologies for business IT needs, ranging from SOA deployments to cloud computing, business process transformation, and IT governance.

JDeveloper, Oracle said in one of its statements on the rollout, lets developers build applications and services across application servers; Oracle's WebLogic Java application server acquired from BEA Systems is a key part of the company's middleware line.

Developers also can leverage the open source Eclipse IDE through Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse, Oracle said.

"In the developer tools space, I think we're really excited with what we've done," said Ted Farrell, chief architect and senior vice president of tools and middleware at Oracle. The launch gets Oracle fully into the ALM space and desktop integration, he said.

As part of today’s announcement, Oracle is offering an upgrade to JDeveloper, identified as version 11.1.1.1, as well an ALM technology called Team Productivity Centre. "It's goal is to bring teams together inside the IDE," Farrell said.

The ALM software lets teams track bugs together and share code, he said. "You can chat with each other right from inside the IDE," said Farrell. Developers can work with third party technologies such as the Subversion version control systems.

All Fusion middleware products plug into JDeveloper. Asked what Oracle's emphasis on JDeveloper and Eclipse means for the Sun-dominated NetBeans IDE, Farrell said he could not comment on what Oracle might do with it. But he did call NetBeans "a viable IDE in the market today."

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