Many system information programs will make at least some attempt to list your PC's hardware. Unfortunately, this doesn't always work as you might expect, and so you might read that your system includes a "PCI\ VEN_1B21& DEV_1080& SUBSYS_78161462& REV_03", or something similarly cryptic.

PCI-Z is a tiny portable tool which tries to get around this problem by querying the PCI ID Repository - a public database of device ID codes - and returning readable names, rather than meaningless codes.

To use the program, just run it and wait. Within a few seconds you should see a table containing your hardware's details: the raw PCI codes, manufacturer, device name, subsystem and error message (if there is one).

Any or all of this data can be copied to the clipboard, or exported as a CSV file for reference later.

Version 1.3 brings:

    - Significant code changes and speedups
    - All database transactions are dealt with through memory
    - "Error message" column no longer appears if there are no errors/problems with devices
    - Added devices class detection
    - Added ability to sort columns
    - Fixed bug where part of menu was left when screenshot was taken
    - CLI output is now more lspci-like

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PCI-Z isn't a program you'll use every day, but it has its place when diagnosing hardware issues, and deserves a place in every geek's troubleshooting toolkit.