Does the world need yet another web browser? Digola clearly thinks so, and has released Sundance on to the world. It’s described as a "simple and fast web browser" with a few bells and whistles to draw attention to itself.

It’s a tiny sub-3MB install, which means it’s clearly not providing its own browser engine; instead Sundance taps into Internet Explorer’s built-in Trident engine to render its web pages. The user interface is minimalist – the main window, of course, plus a row of thumbnails across the top representing individual tabs. Down the right are a series of buttons giving you access to Sundance’s features.

These features include a built-in RSS reader, which works as advertised, but relies on you populating it manually with feeds – even if you browse directly to a feed within the main browser, it’s not smart enough to detect this and offer to add the feed.

Another feature is the one-click translation – browse to a foreign-language web page, click the button and it’ll send it across to Google Translate. Other options include making the screen transparent, switching on browser redirect (which basically makes it possible to view two pages side-by-side in separate panes), a few basic shortcuts and the Search Assistant.

It’s this latter tool that – if anything will – make Sundance attractive to some. Clicking the button reveals the Search Assistant pane on the left, which is designed for performing advanced searches quickly using a choice of Google, Bing or Wikipedia. Additional options – colour-coded to tell you which engine they refer to – allow you to set the interface, country and language, include (or exclude) specific words or phrases, restrict the search to within a domain and even look for specific file types.

If you frequently use any of these engines to search for advanced phrases, then Sundance will appeal, but otherwise there’s nothing here to suggest you’ll be using it in preference to your main browser.

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There’s something to build on here, but we suggest radically updating the user interface and developing some of the extra tools if Sundance wants to make a big impression.