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Glyn Moody

Glyn Moody's look at all levels of the enterprise open source stack. The blog will look at the organisations that are embracing open source, old and new alike (start-ups welcome), and the communities of users and developers that have formed around them (or not, as the case may be).

Adobe Opens Up (A Bit)

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It will come as no surprise to readers of this blog that the old proprietary software companies are finally seeing the light and beginning – some faster, some slower – to open up. Adobe is one such company, and to consolidate its moves it has set up a new site, called simply Adobe Open Source:

Welcome to Open Source at Adobe. This site presents the definitive view into open source activities at Adobe, including details regarding projects that Adobe participates in and hosts.

In addition, you will find information that will help you get involved and keep up with the latest work in the Adobe open source community.

One of the stories on the site concerns Adobe joining the SQLite Consortium:

Adobe has joined with Mozilla and Symbian to support the work of the SQLite Consortium to help ensure free, open access and development of SQLite.

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SQLite is a different concept in SQL databases and is intended for non-traditional roles. SQLite is serverless - it writes directly to ordinary disk file, and SQLite is designed to require no maintenance or administration.

Adobe's support of the SQLite Consortium demonstrates Adobe's commitment to open source, and belief that technologies such as SQLite should remain independent and free in the best interests of the community.

Among those “non-traditional roles” is Google Gears. Adobe's move confirms that SQLite is fast establishing itself as the lightweight open source database of choice.

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