It seems that the lessons about the recalled Toyotas have yet to sink in with senior management. Nearly one in ten businesses finds software testing to be unnecessary, while more than half agree that it's a necessity, but grumble about the cost.

That's according to a survey conducted by quality assurance and testing company Sogeti, which found that 9 percent of software testers were working for businesses who thought that was testing was not a necessity. Only 27 percent thought that testing was a well-funded necessity.

The problems thrown up by inadequate testing were highlighted when Toyota blamed the problems with its anti-lock braking on a software glitch. Despite the bad publicity that this fault had caused for the motor manufacturer, other companies had not learned a lesson. Most respondents to Sogeti's survey confirmed that their companies had not changed their approaches to testing, even though the Toyota episode showed the harm that could be done to a business.

Richard Terry, deputy CEO of Sogeti, said: "Software testing is crucial to ensure product quality and protect reputations, whether it's a new standalone application being introduced by an innovative start-up or mass products being produced and manufactured by global brands. Quality Assurance professionals understand the value and necessity of staying at the front of new trends. Yet as our survey suggests, there may still be limitations facing these crucial functions due to management attitudes."